Online English studies benefit Japanese, Filipinos Copy

“Mohammad Moin tries to realize what he calls “intellectual fair trade” through his operation of an online English conversation school for Japanese — all taught by Filipino teachers.

The inexpensive English lessons are offered to Japanese students via Skype, while at the same time giving employment opportunities to Filipinos — most of whom have graduated from top universities in their countries but have no jobs.

Continue Reading

Online English studies benefit Japanese, Filipinos

“Mohammad Moin tries to realize what he calls “intellectual fair trade” through his operation of an online English conversation school for Japanese — all taught by Filipino teachers.

The inexpensive English lessons are offered to Japanese students via Skype, while at the same time giving employment opportunities to Filipinos — most of whom have graduated from top universities in their countries but have no jobs.

Continue Reading

Filipinos in Japan call for acceptance with new film Copy

“On a crisp late-December afternoon, a group of Filipino women gather at a community center in Tokyo’s Shin-Koiwa district. They are here for a Montessori teacher training workshop.

Some of the women aspire to open their own international preschools. Others hope it will help them in the ESL (English as a second language) job market. As one woman explained, they need extra training and credentials to compete with the “native speaker” instructors — Americans, Canadians, Brits and Aussies — who dominate Japan’s ESL industry.

Continue Reading

Filipinos in Japan call for acceptance with new film Copy

“On a crisp late-December afternoon, a group of Filipino women gather at a community center in Tokyo’s Shin-Koiwa district. They are here for a Montessori teacher training workshop.

Some of the women aspire to open their own international preschools. Others hope it will help them in the ESL (English as a second language) job market. As one woman explained, they need extra training and credentials to compete with the “native speaker” instructors — Americans, Canadians, Brits and Aussies — who dominate Japan’s ESL industry.

Continue Reading

Filipinos in Japan call for acceptance with new film

“On a crisp late-December afternoon, a group of Filipino women gather at a community center in Tokyo’s Shin-Koiwa district. They are here for a Montessori teacher training workshop.

Some of the women aspire to open their own international preschools. Others hope it will help them in the ESL (English as a second language) job market. As one woman explained, they need extra training and credentials to compete with the “native speaker” instructors — Americans, Canadians, Brits and Aussies — who dominate Japan’s ESL industry.

Continue Reading