Who are Gaijins?

Who are Gaijins?

Gaijin (外人?, [ɡaiʤiɴ]) (“outside person”) is a Japanese word for foreigners and non-Japanese. The word is composed of two kanji: gai (外?, “outside”) and jin (人?, “person”). Similarly composed words that refer to foreign things include gaikoku (外国?, “foreign country”) and gaisha (外車?, “foreign car”). The word can refer to nationality, race, or ethnicity, concepts generally conflated in Japan. Some feel the word has come to have a negative or pejorative connotation,[1][2][3][4][5][6] while other observers maintain it is neutral or even positive.[2][7][8][9][10] Gaikokujin (外国人 “foreign-country person”?) is a more neutral and somewhat more formal term widely used in the Japanese...Read more
Video Interview of NGO Helps Japinoy Kids Abandoned by their Japanese Fathers

Video Interview of NGO Helps Japinoy Kids Abandoned by their Japanese Fathers

My OFW Story is a 30-minute public service program that tracks the challenging journeys of Overseas Filipino Workers across the globe. Overseas Filipino Workers (OFWs) are hailed as the country’s new economic heroes for their efforts in uplifting the lives of their families and bolstering the national economy through remittances. In service to this valuable sector My OFW Story brings to perspective current issues facing Filipino migrant workers and educates them on existing policies so they can be made aware of their rights and be able to protect themselves. Through re-enactment of personal stories, viewers are given a glimpse of...Read more

NGO Agencies who can help you find your Japanese father

Philippine Based Non-Government Organizations 1. Maligaya House Maligaya House is Tagalog for “Happy House”. The Citizen’s Network for JFC Inc. ran by our Tokyo Office established in 1998 this local office and Maligaya House is dedicated to helping those Japanese-Filipino Children (JFC) whose Japanese fathers abandoned them, find happiness. Maligaya House fights to protect the human rights of the JFC and give support at they grow to adulthood. During the 1980’s there was an increase in the number of Filipino women going to work in Japan and thus there was more interaction between Japanese men and Filipino women. This lead...Read more
Who are Nikkei-jins?

Who are Nikkei-jins?

he Japanese diaspora, and its individual members known as nikkei (日系?), are Japanese emigrants from Japan and their descendants that reside in a foreign country. Emigration from Japan first happened and was recorded as early as the 12th century to the Philippines,[10] but did not become a mass phenomenon until the Meiji Era, when Japanese began to go to the Philippines,[11] North America, and beginning in 1897 with 35 emigrants to Mexico;[12] and later to Peru, beginning in 1899 with 790 emigrants.[13] There was also significant emigration to the territories of the Empire of Japan during the colonial period; however, most such emigrants repatriated to Japan after the end of World War II in Asia.[14] According to the Association of...Read more
Who are Japanese-Filipino Children or Youth? (JFC / JFY)

Who are Japanese-Filipino Children or Youth? (JFC / JFY)

“The Japanese-Filipino Children, or JFCs, are children born to Japanese and Filipino parents from around the years of rapid economic growth in Japan in the 1980s and up to the present.  The majority of JFCs have Japanese fathers and Filipina mothers. A common estimate on the number of JFCs is from 100,000 to 200,000.  This is only an approximation and the exact number is not known. There have been efforts made by helping organizations to find out more information on the needs and concerns of JFCs.  The Philippine based Center for Japanese-Filipino Children’s Assistance (CJFCS) and the Development Action for Women Network...Read more

How to get a Japanese visa for Filipinos

Relaxation of Visa Requirements for Multiple-entry Visa for Philippine Nationals In celebration of the 40th Year of ASEAN-Japan Friendship and Cooperation, the Government of Japan started on July 1, 2013 the issuance of multiple-entry visas for short-term stay to nationals of the Republic of the Philippines (ordinary passport holders) who reside in their home country. After careful consideration, it was decided that starting from September 30, 2014, certain conditions for issuance of multiple-entry visa for short-term stay to eligible applicants will be further relaxed. Details are stated below. This relaxation measure will be carried out simultaneously for nationals of Vietnam...Read more

Japanese-Filipino, 86, a survivor of bicultural ordeal

“DAVAO CITY, PHILIPPINES – Koichi Sakae was 14 and living on the southern Philippine island of Mindanao when Japan attacked Pearl Harbor in December 1941 and then hours later hit U.S. bases in the Philippines. Sakae, the sixth of eight children of Yamaguchi Prefecture native Naokichi Sakae and Filipino tribeswoman Amoy Bagoba, said he had mostly enjoyed a “good life” until the war began, growing up in Davao City in southern Mindanao, where his father leased a plantation growing abaca, an indigenous plant harvested for its fiber. When the war started, the Philippines had been under American rule for over...Read more

Online English studies benefit Japanese, Filipinos

"Mohammad Moin tries to realize what he calls “intellectual fair trade” through his operation of an online English conversation school for Japanese — all taught by Filipino teachers. The inexpensive English lessons are offered to Japanese students via Skype, while at the same time giving employment opportunities to Filipinos — most of whom have graduated from top universities in their countries but have no jobs.

Filipinos in Japan call for acceptance with new film

"On a crisp late-December afternoon, a group of Filipino women gather at a community center in Tokyo’s Shin-Koiwa district. They are here for a Montessori teacher training workshop. Some of the women aspire to open their own international preschools. Others hope it will help them in the ESL (English as a second language) job market. As one woman explained, they need extra training and credentials to compete with the “native speaker” instructors — Americans, Canadians, Brits and Aussies — who dominate Japan’s ESL industry.

Kung Paano Ka Binubura ng Tatay Mo

Wala ka pa ba sa kosekitohon ng tatay mo? Ano nga ba ang kosekitohon? Ito ang dokumento na nagsasaad ng mga kapanganakan, mga kamatayan, mga pag aampon, pagkilala sa mga anak at paghihiwalay ng mag asawa. Kung baga isa itong all in one papeles na merong birth at death certificate pati adoption papers pati paternal acknowledgment. Dito makikita ang kwento ng isang pamilyang Hapones. Madalas ang ulo lang ng pamilya ang nakapagdadagdag ng mga detalye dito. Para sa mga hapones, ang koseki ang magpapatunay na anak ka nga ng isang hapon. Ang pagkakalagay ng pangalan mo sa dokumentong ito ang...Read more